Tag Archives: Butterick 4087

A new vintage-style apron

Well, that was quick!

I started off with this:

The colors of the fabrics match my kitchen.

The blue, red, and yellow match my kitchen. The green is just for fun.

Three days later, I had this:

Gene is in a corner of my breakfast nook so you can see the colors I was drawing from when I picked the fabrics for my apron.

Gene is in a corner of my breakfast nook so you can see the colors I was drawing from when I picked the fabrics for my apron. She’s also wearing two other garments I made.

Honestly, it could have been done in one day, but I cut it out one day, did half the sewing the second day, then did the final sewing on the third day. What a nice, leisurely sewing pace.

And now I have a pretty new apron. And since I plan to use it, I’m sure it will be stained in no time.

The pattern has an unusual (for the modern day) construction technique. The seam lines for the scalloped fabric trim on the bottom of the skirt and the side parts of the pocket were stay-stitched. Then they were turned back, pressed, lapped on top of the main fabric, and edge-stitched down.

(Actually, before the pieces were lapped, rick-rack was basted onto the seam line of the main piece, so it ended up sandwiched in the seam.)

It was rather like a giant applique. While I haven’t made a piece of clothing with this technique, I have seen vintage reproduction pattern instructions that call for it along curves.

Pressing the seam allowances back was pretty tricky with an iron blasting full steam. I really need to get some ironing gloves before I burn myself.

The pattern didn’t specifically call for any seam finishes, but after I stitched pieces together, I could envision the ravelly mess that would ensue after washing. So, I pinked the edges. Because of the way the pieces were lapped and sewn, this little mishap occurred:

See the round hole and the little crescent shaped one next to it?

See the round hole and the little crescent shaped one next to it?

Well, crap. I didn’t spend too much time crying over it. It is an apron, after all. I just got out my Fray Check and treated both sides of the holes.

But did you notice the other problem? Look closely:

Stems. At the top!

Stems. At the top!

That’s right. The main floral is UPSIDE-DOWN!

Before cutting out the fabric, I quickly scanned it and noted that the blossoms were facing all directions, so I ASSUMED my floral was nondirectional.

Until I had already cut everything out and was placing the finished pocket on the skirt.

That’s when I was annoyed to discover the little grouping of stem ends facing up. UP? What?! I expect this in a home dec fabric, but why would anyone design a quilting cotton floral that’s (just barely) directional? Grrr. Truth be told, the upside-down bouquets are more annoying to me than the little holes courtesy of my pinking shears.

Deep breath.

OK. Well, regardless, I now have a darling little apron that I will actually use. One last look:

Despite the flaws, so cute!

Despite the flaws, so cute!

I like having a fancy apron so much that I’m intending to make another one from a different vintage-style pattern in my stash. I already purchased a darling reproduction 1930s quilting fabric from Country Sewing Center, the really nice quilt store here in town, but I still need to buy bias tape.

The pattern calls for making 7 yards of 1/4-inch bias tape from scratch, but I don’t want to get that up close and personal with my steam iron. Plus, that seems really narrow. So, I’m taking the lazy route and buying regular double-fold bias tape.

That project will be up next.

 

Mood board: Stash-busting vintage-style apron

I discovered a couple of fun fabrics as I attempted to tidy my stash.

They were intended for a casserole tote that I had seen in a magazine, but by the time my fabric was (somewhat) organized, I didn’t know where the instructions were.

I had 1 yard each of two fabrics, so I checked my pattern stash for kitchen accessories. I found a pattern of vintage-style aprons, and the amount of fabric was perfect for one of them. I only needed to purchase some rick-rack and matching bias tape. Here’s the mood board:

The colors of the fabrics match my kitchen.

My kitchen is blue, red and yellow; and I bought the fabric (originally for a casserole tote) to coordinate. That would explain the purchase of yellow-based fabric to go with a floral with no yellow in it. 

The pattern is Butterick 4087 (out of print), and I’m making View C, the one in the upper-right-hand corner. Here’s a closer look:

This apron has a shaped waistband and hem and a cute little pocket. This looks like dotted Swiss was used for the main fabric and a cotton floral for the accent fabric. Impractical, but so cute!

The best part of this quick, fun, stash-busting project? No full-bust adjustment needed! In no time at all, I’ll have a pretty little apron that coordinates with my kitchen.

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