Progress on the Paris muslin

The Paris wearable muslin has turned into quite a project unto itself. I was mainly concerned with the fit of the bodice because I had made some crazy alterations to the pattern I was not at all sure would work. But they seemed to do what I wanted them to do.

The front:

Here is the original muslin. You can see the gap at the front edges, which means the center fronts are even further apart. And I keep the waist set at smaller than my own waist, otherwise waistbands that fit me won't fit it.

The original muslin. See the gap at the front edges? The center fronts are even further apart.

The renovated front looks good! The only issue is the stiffness of the quilt-weight fabric.

The renovated front looks good! The only issue is the stiffness of the quilt-weight fabric.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I did not even attempt to match the pattern across the front. That would have been crazy, particularly for an experiment.

The back:

The back fit me just fine.

The back fit me just fine except for being too short. My dress form can’t expand to my back length.

The back is unchanged except I made it an inch longer. My dress form doesn't expand enough for my back length, so it looks too long here.

The back is unchanged except I made it an inch longer. It looks too long here, but isn’t on me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The side:

The side view shows that it rides up in front because it needs more length.

The side view shows that it rides up in front because it needs more length.

Aha! The waist seam is horizontal. This is good. If you look closely enough to see the dart I put in, you'll note that it's pretty low. That's because my dress form has unnaturally high "girls." Really, she looks sort of deformed with them up that high.

Aha! The waist seam is horizontal, and the length is just where it needs to be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once I was sure the changes to the bodice were working, I altered the front skirt pattern and went to cut out the rest of the pattern pieces. I had enough fabric according to the pattern requirements, but I hadn’t used the suggested pattern layout because I just cut out the bodice pieces at first. Turns out, the front facing wouldn’t fit. I could have cut it cross grain and pieced it, but this fabric is directional. One of the pattern views shows a contrasting collar and front facing, so some white sateen that was in my stash is currently in the dryer.

Here is my mood board for the wearable muslin:

Here's the mood board for my Paris muslin: the crazy fabric, plus buttons and a slide buckle, all from my stash. You can see why I decided on red thread. The buttons were sewn to the card with red thread, and I thought the look would be perfect on my crazy Paris muslin.

There’s the Paris fabric, plus buttons and a buckle, all from my stash. The only purchase I had to make for this muslin was red thread.

I think the white accents will really pop on the fabric and calm it all down. You can see why I decided on red thread. The buttons were sewn to the card with red thread, and I thought the look would be perfect. This is an awful lot of effort for a wearable muslin, but it looks like it’s working. It should be really nice once I make it in the pretty teal and navy lawn. If I don’t run out of inspiration before I get there!

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4 thoughts on “Progress on the Paris muslin

  1. melisssa May 31, 2013 at 6:28 am Reply

    Please tell me we get a picture of you wearing this wild print!

    Like

  2. Ellen Clark June 5, 2014 at 4:46 am Reply

    How did you alter the front bodice. I have the same problem where the center front overlaps.

    Like

  3. Jeanne Marie June 5, 2014 at 8:14 am Reply

    Ellen, I cut the bodice front pattern vertically in two places, from the shoulder to the waist, between the pleats. Then I spread the pattern and filled in the gap. This didn’t change the shoulder width because there are already gathers there and I could just gather them tighter. It did add width to the waistline, so I added the same width to the corresponding skirt panels.

    Like

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